Mathematics

COVID-19 and Remote Learning Information

Due to Covid-19 circumstances, most of a student’s course loads are divided between two semesters. During one semester, a course covers the equivalent of curriculum from a full fall term and a full spring term for a total of one year of instruction. 

A student receives 2.0 credits per course (equivalent to 1 year of instruction.)

 

By offering our courses on a semester basis, we are supporting deeper and more focused learning. We offer more personalized support, without sacrificing time allotted to the course. AP courses have the equivalent of twice the amount of time to engage in the content and skills compared to years past. 

 

When college admission representatives review a student’s transcript, they review it holistically and with attention to student progress from year to year. Colleges review the courses a student takes in the fall as well as the spring semester of their senior year. 

 

Alyssa Collins, Assistant Principal
 
The Mathematics Department is committed to expanding students’ understanding and appreciation of mathematics through a comprehensive, content-based plan that acknowledges and addresses differences in motivation, goals, ability, and learning styles. All students must complete three years of mathematics and pass a Regents examination.
 
All mathematics courses are year-long courses.
 

Mathematics Regents Examinations

Students must score a minimum of 65 on the examinations that qualify them for either a Regents Diploma or an Advanced Regents Diploma.
 
Regents Diploma
  • 65 or above on any Math Regents
Advanced Regents Diploma
  • 3 Exams
  • Algebra I
  • Geometry
  • Algebra II/Trigonometry

Grading Policy

 
  • Major Assessments                50%
  • Participation/Classwork      25%
  • Homework/Preparation      15%
  • Final Exam/Project —  10%

Course Offerings

Please note: In each department, not all courses are offered each year.

The Mathematics Department is committed to expanding students’ understanding and appreciation of mathematics through a comprehensive, content-based plan that acknowledges and addresses differences in motivation, goals, ability, and learning styles. All students must complete three years of mathematics and pass a Regents Examination.

All mathematics courses are year-long courses.
 

The Mathematics Department is committed to expanding students’ understanding and appreciation of mathematics through a comprehensive, content-based plan that acknowledges and addresses differences in motivation, goals, ability, and learning styles. All students must complete three years of mathematics and pass a Regents Examination.     

All mathematics courses are year-long courses.

Algebra 1  - Regents  - - This is the first mathematics course in high school. This is a 1 year (2 semester) Regents course. Algebra provides tools and develops ways of thinking that are necessary for solving problems in a wide variety of disciplines such as science, business, and fine arts. Linear equations, quadratic functions, absolute value, and exponential functions are studied. Data analysis is integrated into this course, including measures of central tendency and lines of best fit. Students will take the Common Core Algebra 1 Regents Examination at the conclusion of this course. Students will work towards achieving a mastery level of 85 or higher on the Regents exam.

 

Geometry - Regents This is the second mathematics course in the high school sequence. In this course, students will have the opportunity to make conjectures about geometric situations and prove in a variety of ways that their conclusion follows logically from their hypothesis. Congruence and similarity of triangles will be established using appropriate theorems. Transformations including rotations, reflections, translations, and dilations will be taught. Properties of triangles, quadrilaterals and circles will be examined. Geometry is meant to lead students to an understanding that reasoning and proof are fundamental aspects of mathematics. Students will be introduced to the basic trigonometric ratios in right triangles and model real-world situations with trigonometry, as well as with volume and density of three-dimensional figures. In this course, students will apply algebra skills within various geometric contexts. Skills include, but are not limited to, solving linear equations, solving quadratic equations, solving systems of linear equations, and operations with radicals. Students will take the Geometry Regents Examination at the conclusion of this course.

 

Algebra 2 - Regents - This is the third mathematics course in the high school sequence. In this course, the number system will be extended to include imaginary and complex numbers. Students will learn the characteristics of a variety of functions: polynomial, rational, radical, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic. Problem situations involving direct and indirect variation will be solved. Data analysis will be extended to include measures of dispersion and the analysis of regression models. Arithmetic and geometric sequences and series will be evaluated. Binomial expressions will provide the basis for the study of probability theory and the normal probability distribution will be analyzed. Right triangle trigonometry will be expanded to include the investigation of circular functions, as well as problems requiring the use of trigonometric equations and identities. Students will take the Algebra 2 Regents Examination at the conclusion of this course, which is a requirement for the Advanced Regents Diploma.

 

Pre-Calculus – Pre-Calculus is a 2 semester course designed to build upon algebraic and geometric concepts at a level which will prepare students for AP Calculus and College Algebra. The course extends the content of Algebra II by continuing to develop algebra skills with such topics as higher degree polynomials, complex rational and exponential functions and trigonometry concepts. Students will expand their conceptual understanding of functions and their graphs.  The course will explore analytic geometry and the calculus of limits, derivatives and their applications. Application-based problem solving is an integral part of the course and instruction will include use of technology to facilitate continued development. Students will study limits algebraically, numerically, graphically and verbally. This approach will help prepare students for the focus of AP Calculus AB.

 

Introduction to Computer Programming

Intro to Computer Programming is a course intentionally designed for beginning high school programmers. No prior programming experience is needed! The course introduces students to programming at first through Snap!, a graphic-based programming language aimed at first-time programmers, and in the second semester, Python, a text-based language used widely in the industry. With these languages, students explore fundamental programming concepts through daily practice and end-of-unit game projects. This course is a great and uncommon opportunity for students in high school to jump into the expanding and increasingly important world of programming.

 

This class is intended for any student who:

 

Has an interest (big or small) in programming

Likes asking questions and thinking about the way things work

Desires to see how their creativity can be applied through programming 

Prerequisites: None

 

Calculus AB, Advanced Placement - Calculus AB is a full-year course and consists of the content of a typical one-semester college calculus course. It is the culmination of the high school mathematics experience. Students will use skills and knowledge they developed in earlier courses to learn how to interpret mathematical content and they will do so using algebraic, graphical, tabular, and verbal methods throughout the course.

 

Calculus BC, Advanced Placement - This is a full-year course that follows AP Calculus AB and is roughly equivalent to a college Calculus 2 course. Students will review and extend their knowledge of algebra, geometry, trigonometry, calculus, and other areas as appropriate for test preparation. Students study more advanced differentiation, integration, infinite series and other calculus topics. 

 

Computer Science Principles, Advanced Placement - 

This a full-year course.  The AP Computer Science Principles course is designed to be equivalent to a  first-semester introductory college computing course. In this course, students will develop computational thinking skills vital for success across all disciplines, such as using computational tools to analyze and study data and working with large data sets to analyze, visualize, and draw conclusions from trends. The course is unique in its focus on fostering student creativity. Students are encouraged to apply creative processes when developing computational artifacts and to think creatively while using computer software and other technology to explore questions that interest them. They will also develop effective communication and collaboration skills, working individually and collaboratively to solve problems, and discussing and writing about the importance of these problems and the impacts to their community, society, and the world.

 

Statistics, Advanced Placement - AP Statistics is a year-long course in which students study topics generally covered in an introductory statistics course at the university level.  The four major topics covered are:

 

Analyzing Data

Experimental Design

Probability

Statistical Inference

 

The course is a mixture of lecture, group activities, paired problem solving, and class discussion. Unlike traditional math courses, AP Statistics focuses on describing patterns, understanding, and writing conclusions in context as well as numerical calculations. As such, students who are strong readers and writers tend to be very successful in this course. 

 

Sample Math Sequencing




Grade 9 Algebra 1 Geometry
Grade 10 Geometry Algebra 2 / Trigonometry
Grade 11 Algebra 2 / Trigonometry Calculus, AP Calculus AB, AP Calculus BC
Grade 12 AP Statistics AP Calculus AB, AP Calculus BC, AP Statistics